Sponsored_products_organization

How to Organize Your Amazon Sponsored Products Campaigns

Amazon Sponsored Products campaign organization is often an overlooked topic. Most Amazon sellers tend to focus on keywords, average CPC and ACoS percentages. Because that is where the majority of time is spent optimizing campaigns. It’s easy to get started on Sponsored Products without any experience. We see many sellers create tangled messes of their campaigns without much thought for the organization. Spending time upfront thinking about campaign organization will pay dividends months down the road.

We’ve combined our conversations with industry experts, our knowledge of Amazon’s technology, and observations from thousands of campaigns to bring you this guide on how to organize your Sponsored Products Campaigns. Let’s get started.

Group Similar Products Together

The first thing to consider before you get started is how you plan to group your products for creating campaigns. This is an area of some debate because Amazon’s documentation and recommendation say to create separate campaigns for each brand and category. However, that strategy is necessary for large resellers with tens of thousands of products.

CAMPAIGN_GRAPH

Create one set of campaigns per parent ASIN

If you have a product with variations, each one should be grouped together for every campaign.  Amazon’s algorithm will test each of your variations to determine which one works best for each keyword. After a few weeks, you’ll see that a few of the variations receive the vast majority of impressions and clicks.

Exceptions

If you sell in apparel, shoes, or have similar products at similar price points, chances are you’ll be sharing a lot of the same keywords and advertising goals. If this is the case, you should consider grouping them into shared campaigns.

Examples

If you sell apple slicers and water bottles, we suggest treating these as separate groups of products. If your apple slicer comes in six different colors, all six colors would be advertised together.

If you sell clothing, you might have 20 different styles of men’s short sleeved T-shirts. Each style might have 5 sizes and 10 color variations. All 1,000 of those individual SKUs could be treated as one group and advertised together. If you also sell long-sleeved men’s shirts, all of your long-sleeved men’s shirts might be another product grouping.

Multiple campaigns per product grouping

Once you’ve decided how to group your products together, we suggest starting with two campaigns for each product grouping. Come up with a meaningful short name like “Water Bottles” or “Men’s T-Shirts” for the group of products. You’ll be using these names for a long time, so don’t use dates or employee’s names in them (i.e. “Brandon’s campaign” or “Water Bottles March 8th”).

Next, create an automatic-targeted campaign named “Water Bottles AUTO”. Put a small daily budget of around $5 for this campaign. Inside that campaign create an ad group with a $0.25 default bid. The “Default Ad Group” name is fine in the automatic-targeted campaign. Inside that ad group, enter all of your products for this grouping.

Now, you’ll need to create a manual-targeted campaign named “Water Bottles MANUAL”. We suggest a daily budget of $20.00 to start accumulating clicks and history. Inside this campaign, create three ad groups. Create an ad group named “Broad Match” with a $1.00 default bid. The second ad group should be named “Phrase Match” with a $1.25 default bid. And the final ad group should be named “Exact Match with a $1.50 default bid. Inside each of those three ad groups, select the products related to this grouping.

This should give you the basic setup for gettings started with Sponsored Products. The automatic-targeting campaigns will find new keyword opportunities at a low cost-per-click. The manual targeting campaign is set up for you to start learning about how each keyword performs. This gives your ads the structure to bid more specifically on terms where you have more history and confidence.

Next, you’ll want to add appropriate keywords to the manual-targeted campaign. A tool like Scope will help you identify relevant keywords to begin with. There are several schools of thought on how to select keywords, but to keep things simple at first, we suggest using suggestions from Scope that don’t overlap.

For example, start a broad match ad group for “water bottle”, but don’t use the keyword “aluminum water bottle”. Because the search phrase “aluminum water bottle” will be contained within the broad match keyword “water bottle”. Let the campaign gather data for future optimizations. This will help to determine if you should create a separate keyword for “aluminum water bottle”.

Advanced Users

The two basic campaigns mentioned above should work fine for most users. We mentioned a few of these advanced tactics so that you can see how others might use them. For advanced users, we don’t recommend starting with a novice approach.

Advanced users should create additional campaigns for different purposes. The manual campaign mentioned above becomes a “learning” campaign, and as you gain history from that campaign, you would start to move your keywords into new campaigns with more specific goals.

A common tactic is to create a manual targeted “winners” campaign that contains keywords you’ve identified that perform well and have a low ACOS. You’d set a high daily budget for this campaign so you don’t ever lose out on clicks because of your budget running out.

Another common manual-targeted campaign type is for your branded terms. When users are searching for your brand name, you’d expect to convert well and have a low ACOS. By putting a small bid on these highly converting terms, it often helps to prevent competitors from bidding on them and taking your sales.

Beyond those, advanced users might want to create a campaign for a competitor’s keywords. Expect your ACOS on this campaign to be high. Set a daily budget that allows you to pick up some sales without breaking the bank.

Final Thoughts

A well-organized campaign structure will make finding and optimizing ads easier. Keep in mind that your campaign structure evolves over time. You will discover what is working within a couple of weeks of beginning. An organized campaign structure will enable you to pull your ad levers on or off easily.

Keep your campaign structure simple and consistent across all of your ASINs. The one product per campaign strategy is going to be your simplest and most effective method of organization.

Need a tool that makes this all easier? Ignite automatically sets up campaigns in this structure and makes optimization easy.

Automate your ads with Ignite, our new Amazon Sponsored Products tool.

Brandon Checketts

Brandon is one of the co-founders and main data geek for Seller Labs. He started Seller Labs after finding no other tools that could provide the flexibility needed for his used-book business. He no longer sells online, but now guides Seller Labs as the lead innovator to make sure that our products remain on the cutting edge.

This Post Has 28 Comments
  1. I’m a tech newbie question …how can I get the Search Term Report to open up in Google doc ? I tried on a few computers and always opens in WordPress and I can’t read it.

    1. you have to open in google drive but not “doc”, use “spreadsheet”, then go to “import data” and import the text. click on “replace current sheet” and leave everything else as-is. this is beautifully import your data in a very easy to read format, and you can “sort” through each column so look at various factors. I like to sort by number of clicks, acos, and/or impression (right click on the colllumn at the very top and click on “sort Z-A). hope that helps.

  2. I’m a tech newbie question …how can I get Each Term Report to open up in Google doc ? I tried on a few computers and always opens in WordPress and I can’t read it.

    1. you have to open in google drive but not “doc”, use “spreadsheet”, then go to “import data” and import the text. click on “replace current sheet” and leave everything else as-is. this is beautifully import your data in a very easy to read format, and you can “sort” through each column so look at various factors. I like to sort by number of clicks, acos, and/or impression (right click on the colllumn at the very top and click on “sort Z-A). hope that helps.

  3. So with two different listings of two different girls socks (no variations on each, both separate single asin listings), both should be grouped together in one campaign?

  4. So with two different listings of two different girls socks (no variations on each, both separate single asin listings), both should be grouped together in one campaign?

    1. Probably. Clothing and apparel is where it can get tricky. Assuming that both pairs of socks will share most of the same keywords, I think it is fine to put them into the same campaigns and ad groups.

      Once you’ve done it for a while, you might find reason to create separate ad groups or campaigns for them, but getting started, I would definitely keep them together until your data tells you otherwise, or you have more experience to where having them together is prohibiting you from doing what you want.

  5. all sellers know it well amazon PPC is is so highest cost also how much sellers will spend for amazon ppc as the profit they can got?
    I think never . Cause business depend on just amazon serach engine . If any guys know about amazon POLICY , that mean it is not he can make a good business , cause amazon seller which news knows basically from a lot of online articles about amazon how they could trust it . BUt they everybody trust and do it . This seller getting loss in their business .

    Not only amazon policy can not help you to do well and profitable business on amazon . Here is depends a few system . Please follow our website to get details https://amzmarketingcom.wixsite.com/amazonmarketingland

  6. all sellers know it well amazon PPC is is so highest cost also how much sellers will spend for amazon ppc as the profit they can got?
    I think never . Cause business depend on just amazon serach engine . If any guys know about amazon POLICY , that mean it is not he can make a good business , cause amazon seller which news knows basically from a lot of online articles about amazon how they could trust it . BUt they everybody trust and do it . This seller getting loss in their business .

    Not only amazon policy can not help you to do well and profitable business on amazon . Here is depends a few system . Please follow our website to get details https://amzmarketingcom.wixsite.com/amazonmarketingland

    1. It’s always a good idea to trust an Indian guy with bad English that’s spamming the comments section on SellerLabs.

  7. Hi Brandon. Are you sure about being able to create Ad Groups in a Campaign? I am not able to do this in our account.

  8. Hi Brandon. Are you sure about being able to create Ad Groups in a Campaign? I am not able to do this in our account.

    1. You definitely can create Ad Groups inside a campaign. I’m not sure if you are asking something more complicated than that.

      1. Are you able to post a screenshot here? I can’t really see in our account to ability to create ad groups within a campaign.

      2. Hello. I am talking about the Sponsored Ads via the Amazon Marketing Services (AMS). Yes, you are right that we can create Ad Groups via the Seller Central Sponsored Ads. Sorry for the confusion.

  9. Multiple SKUs in one ad-group in a manual campaign. Wouldn’t that limit the control over bid adjustments on the individual SKU level? For example, in an ad-group of four items where one item is converting, with the format that you suggested, I am unable to decrease bids for the 3 items that are not responding well, but rather adjustments made are across the board.

  10. Multiple SKUs in one ad-group in a manual campaign. Wouldn’t that limit the control over bid adjustments on the individual SKU level? For example, in an ad-group of four items where one item is converting, with the format that you suggested, I am unable to decrease bids for the 3 items that are not responding well, but rather adjustments made are across the board.

    1. We recommend adding all SKU’s of the same Parent ASIN into each Ad Group for a manual campaign. Amazon’s system will cycle through the variations and determine which works best for which keywords. Trying to optimize which specific keywords go to which specific variations, in our experience, is a lot of work for minimal return.

  11. Hi Brandon. I wonder why we need to create separate ad groups for different keyword match types instead of just one ad group but adding all keywords in 3 different match types and of course varying bids? Just curious on the explanation behind this.

    1. The reasoning here is that you can only set daily budget at the campaign level. If everything is in one campaign, you could exhaust daily budget with broad match keywords and limit impressions on your best keywords. If you put your best keywords in their own campaign with a high daily budget, your “keyword discovery” campaigns will never limit impressions on your “winner” keywords.

      1. I was wondering the same. The suggestion was to have the 3 different match types in 3 separate ad groups, not in separate campaigns. And on Ad group level there is no daily budget.

  12. What about keyword cannibalisation?
    Should I be aware of adding the targeted keyword from “Exact” type match as negative to “Phrase” & “Broad” match types?
    Would the keywords be competing with each other if I wouldn’t add them as negative ones?

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